Education and Training Act Updates


School Board Objectives

MoE Commentary

The Act revises the objectives for school boards of trustees to:

  • ensure school governance is underpinned by Te Tiriti o Waitangi and relevant student rights, and
  • refocus boards on a wider range of objectives so that educational achievement is no longer the only primary objective. It is instead one of four primary objectives, alongside objectives for schools to ensure the physical and emotional safety of students and staff, that they are inclusive and cater for students with differing needs and that they give effect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

These changes are intended to strengthen school governance and refocus schools on what matters most for learners and their whānau.

NZSTA Commentary

What are the changes?

Section 127 of the Education and Training Act 2020 (the Act) refocuses school boards on a wider range of primary objectives, with educational achievement sitting alongside three others, each equally as important as the other. The board’s primary objectives in governing a school are to ensure that:

  • every student at the school is able to attain their highest possible standard in educational achievement
  • the school is a physically and emotionally safe place for all students and staff, gives effect to relevant student rights and takes all reasonable steps to eliminate racism, stigma, bullying, and any other forms of discrimination within the school
  • the school is inclusive of, and caters for, students with differing needs
  • the school gives effect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi, including by working to ensure that its plans, policies, and local curriculum reflect local tikanga Māori, mātauranga Māori, and te ao Māori; taking all reasonable steps to make instruction available in tikanga Māori and te reo Māori and achieving equitable outcomes for Māori students

What do boards need to do differently now?

In order to meet these primary objectives that board will need to govern its school taking into account any statement of national education and learning priorities (NELP) issued by the Minister under section 5 of the Act. Achievement of the NELPs would form part of the board’s strategic thinking, goal setting, planning and policy making.

If applicable, commitments to the achievement of community of learning I kāhui ako challenges would also feature in the board’s goal setting and planning.

Regarding every student attaining their highest possible standard in educational achievement, the board’s obligations around the national curriculum, teaching and learning programmes, monitoring and reporting students’ progress and financial responsibilities remain.

There will be greater emphasis on boards creating a school culture that is inclusive and welcoming of all students, staff, family, whānau, visitors and members of the wider community. Board strategy and policy should encompass not only students with special learning needs, physical or mental disabilities but also new-comers to the school, frequently transitioning students and people of ethnic minority, different beliefs or sexual orientations. In fact, all should feel welcome and safe at the school.

To give effect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi, boards will need to build strong relationships with local hapū and iwi. Board policy should ensure that the local component of the curriculum reflects te ao Māori, Mātauranga Māori and any local iwi education plan for its children. There should be an emphasis on the importance of local history and practices. The board’s commitment to equitable outcomes for Māori students will be reflected in its goals and planning, monitoring and reporting processes.

When does this come into effect?

The revised objectives for student educational achievement, physically and emotional safety and inclusivity took effect upon enactment and are in force now. The objective relating to Te Tiriti o Waitangi will come into force on 1 January 2021. This will provide schools with more time to become familiar with the changes required under this objective and prepare to give effect to them.

Source: www.education.govt.nz: Education and Training Act 2020 – Amending school board objectives

Useful links

 

New powers for the Secretary for Education when a state of emergency, transition period or epidemic notice is in place

MoE Commentary

The Secretary for Education has new powers to act when a state of emergency or transition period is declared or an epidemic notice is in place. These powers can be found in sections 653 to 658 and include directing governing authorities of education entities to close and open for physical attendance or instruction, placing restrictions on attendance, and directing that education or instruction be provided in specified ways, such as distance learning.

NZSTA Commentary

What are the changes?

To ensure that the education sector is able to respond to future emergencies and epidemics, sections 653-658 of the Education and Training Act 2020 (the Act) provide a new set of powers for the Secretary for Education. 

These powers come into effect when a state of emergency is declared, or a transition period is notified under the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002, or an epidemic notice is in place under the Epidemic Preparedness Act 2006.

All education entities may be covered by a direction from the Secretary including all schools and school hostels.

The intention is to support the response to, and recovery from, an emergency or an epidemic and, at these times, the Secretary has the power to direct a school board to comply with specified requirements to:

  • close or open its school or any part of it
  • close or open its school for physical attendance or instruction, or both
  • set restrictions on the attendance of students and those working at its school, bearing in mind any relevant employment or health and safety legislation
  • comply with specified requirements for the operation, management, and control of its school
  • provide education or instruction in any specified ways e.g. distance or online learning 

The Secretary may also renew, amend, or revoke a direction while the relevant state of emergency, transition period, or epidemic notice is in force e.g. direct a school to reopen during an emergency if closure is no longer justified after consulting with the board and other relevant people. 

What do boards need to do differently now?

Boards must put any direction from the Secretary into action either immediately, on the day it is given, or on any later date that is specified in the direction.

A direction overrides every other provision of the Education and Training Act 2020 (apart from the provisions set out in sections 653 to 658).

A direction does not override the provisions of any other Act, including the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002, the Epidemic Preparedness Act 2006, the Health Act 1956, and the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015.

A direction expires on its specified expiry date or the date on which the relevant state of emergency, transitional period, or epidemic notice ends – whichever comes first. 

When does this come into effect?

These new powers when a state of emergency, transition period or epidemic notice is in place took effect upon enactment of the Act and are in force now.

Useful links

Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002

Epidemic Preparedness Act 2006

Health Act 1956

Health and Safety at Work Act 2015

Religious instruction to become opt-in

MoE Commentary

The Act (section 58) provides that if the board of a State primary or intermediate school chooses to close their school for religious instruction to take place, then the principal must have written permission from students’ parents that they may attend  and ensure that the other, pre-existing, conditions are met.

Previously, parents and caregivers needed to write to the principal if they did not wish their child to attend religious instruction. This change ensures that children are only attending religious instruction with their parent or caregiver’s written consent.

NZSTA Commentary

What are the changes?

Section 58 of the Education and Training Act 2020 (the Act) states that a student enrolled at a State primary or intermediate school may only attend or take part in any religious instruction at the school if a parent of the student has confirmed in writing to the principal that they wish the student to do so.

This requires “opting-in”.

This change ensures that students of State primary and intermediate schools only attend religious instruction with their parent’s written consent.

For the purposes of this part of the Act, the definition of “parent” is the mother, father, or guardian of the individual.

What do boards need to do differently now?

Previously, parents needed to write to the principal if they did not wish their child to attend religious instruction.

This required “opting-out”.

In addition

A board does not have to allow religious instruction and observances. However, if it does choose to do so, it must meet all its legal obligations including complying with New Zealand’s human rights laws.  

The New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (NZBORA) and the Human Rights Act 1993 give all people in New Zealand the right to be free from discrimination based on their religious or non-religious beliefs and religious instruction must be done in a way that does not discriminate against anyone on these bases.

For clarification

Religious instruction is the teaching or endorsing of a particular faith. It is the non-neutral, partisan teaching of religion which supports or encourages student belief in the religion being taught. Religious instruction is not part of the New Zealand Curriculum or Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

Religious observances are ceremonial or devotional acts of religion, such as prayers, the singing of hymns, or religious readings. Religious observances are not part of the New Zealand Curriculum or Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, and are not covered in these guidelines. 

Religious education is the neutral teaching and presentation of information about religion, sometimes in the context of studying customary and cultural practices in curriculum subjects, such as the social sciences learning area of the New Zealand Curriculum or within Te Marautanga o Aotearoa Tikanga-ā-Iwi.

When does this come into effect?

This new requirement to opt into attendance of religious instruction took effect upon enactment of the Act and is in force now.

Useful links

Guidelines on religious instruction  in state primary schools, intermediate schools  and ngā kura, May 2019

Note: The Ministry’s guidelines for primary and intermediate schools on religious instruction are being updated to reflect the change to opt-in instruction.

New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

Human rights Act 1993

School rules (bylaws) consultation

MoE Commentary

Boards can make rules (also known as bylaws) to govern their school. These rules are given the status of law. Under the 1989 Act, there was no requirement on boards to consult before they made rules, which was inconsistent with the obligation to consult imposed on entities with comparable ability to make rules/bylaws.

Section 126 introduced a requirement for boards to consult their students (as appropriate), staff and school when making rules. As well as bringing boards into line with other entities empowered to make bylaws, the new requirement enables greater staff, student, and community engagement with key governance decisions that may significantly impact them.

What are the changes?

School boards have previously been able to make bylaws. Section 126 of the Education and Training Act 2020 introduces a new requirement that before doing so, in some cases, a board must consult its staff, students (to the extent that the board considers appropriate), and the school community. 

The school community includes:

  • The parents and whānau of students enrolled at the school
  • The Māori community associated with the school
  • The proprietors, if a state integrated school 
  • Key community groups or representatives
  • Any other group of people that would be significantly impacted by decisions made by the board
What is a bylaw?

A school rule made by the board is a bylaw. A board may delegate authority to make school rules to the principal, or other members of staff. These are also bylaws. 

What do boards need to do differently now?

School rules

Boards must consult when making a new school rule or making a change to an existing school rule if:

  • It is made by the board or by the principal or other staff member with delegated authority from the board
  • The school intends to enforce full compliance with the rule and there will be disciplinary and/or negative consequences for any student that does not follow or ‘breaks’ the rule. 

Also, the board must consult if the school rule has implications for students’ legal rights.

For example - the board intends to make a rule that students must wear the correct uniform for all hours of the school day. The rule will be enforced and students not wearing correct uniform will be given detentions. The board must consult the school’s community because:

  • The board intends to enforce compliance with the rule 
  • The rule will impact on students’ legal rights in terms of their freedom of expression

Board policy

  • New board policies that meet the above criteria should also be consulted on
  • The board should also consult whenever it plans to change existing policy that meets the bylaw test above
When does the board NOT need to consult?

Your board does not need to consult on general management decisions.

For example - maintenance is taking place in a classroom and it is a health and safety risk for students to enter.  The principal has made a rule making the classroom out of bounds for students.  Students who break this rule will be given detentions. The board does not need to consult the school’s community because:

  • Even though there will be consequences for breaches of the rule, this is a general management decision made by the principal, not the board, or on delegated authority from the board

Note: the board does not need to consult on governance policies and procedures that do not meet the criteria mentioned above.

Why the change to requiring consulting on a bylaw in some circumstances?

Today there is better understanding about how school rules can negatively impact on a student’s educational progress and achievement. 

Boards now have four primary objectives in governing schools. They include giving effect to student rights: in the Education and Training Act 2020 and in two other Acts. These are the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the Human Rights Act 1993.  

When does this come into effect?

This new requirement took effect upon enactment of the Act and is in force now.

Useful links

MoE - 'Consulting on bylaws (school rules)'

 Last updated: 13 May 2021

Board code of conduct

What are the changes?

Section 166 of the Education and Training Act gives the Minister of Education power to issue a mandatory national code of conduct for board members of State and State-integrated schools. This will set out minimum standards of integrity and conduct for each member.

Before issuing a code of conduct the Minister must consult with national bodies representing the interests of boards (e.g. NZSTA) and anyone else that the Minister considers appropriate.

A code of conduct for the members of State school boards is a disallowable instrument – what does this mean?

Most of the legislation enacted each year is not made by Parliament directly. It is made by other people or bodies under powers delegated to them by Parliament. “Delegated legislation” is used to describe all types of legislation (e.g. a code of conduct for the members of State school boards) made under powers delegated by Parliament.

The Legislation Act 2012 uses the term “disallowable instrument” to describe delegated legislation that must be presented to, and can be disallowed by, the House of Representatives.

Under section 166 (4) of the Education and Training Act 2020 a code of conduct for the members of State school boards is a disallowable instrument.

What do boards need to do differently now?

There is no mandatory code for board members yet. In the meantime boards, who have not already done so, may wish to adopt a code of conduct voluntarily. An example code can be found in the NZSTA Governance framework 2018 (Policy B2)

What will happen when the Minister issues the mandatory national code of conduct for board members?

Every board member must comply with a code issued by the Minister under section 166 of the Act.

Section 167 permits a board to specify additional standards of conduct for its members. This must be done by resolution of the board. The additional standards must be consistent with the code issued by the Minister and the requirements of all legislation.

Note: Teachers holding practising certificates who are also staff representatives on a school board must follow the Teaching Council’s code of conduct. Section 168 states that if there is a conflict between standards in the two codes, then the Teaching Council’s code of conduct takes priority.

What if a board member does not comply with the code of conduct?

Boards may censure a board member (other than a principal) for any significant or persistent breach of a code issued under sections 166 and 167. This would be done by resolution in public excluded business (“in committee”) and recorded in the minutes of that meeting.

The Minister may remove a board member (other than the principal) for any significant or persistent breach of a code issued under sections 166 and 167 if the board:

  • considers the board member’s failure to comply with the code warrants their removal and
  • has presented the Minister with a written report about the board member’s failure that recommends the removal of the board member and
  • the Minister is satisfied that there is just cause* to remove the board member

The removal must be made by written notice to the board member stating the date it takes effect and the reasons for it. This notice must be copied to the board and the removal must be notified in the Gazette as soon as is practicable.

*Just cause includes misconduct, inability to perform the functions of office, neglect of duty, and breach of any of the collective duties of the board or the individual duties of members (depending on the seriousness of the breach).

When does this come into effect?

Section 166, which gives the Minister power to issue a mandatory code of conduct, is in force now. After the process to develop the code is completed a notice will be published in the Gazette which will:

  • Advise the date on which the code comes into force
  • Set out the code in full, or advise how and where copies can be obtained

Useful links

NZSTA Governance framework

All students have the right to attend school fulltime

MoE commentary

Section 33 of the Education and Training Act explicitly includes the right of all enrolled students to attend school during all the hours the school is open for instruction. Section 34 of the Act clarifies that students with special education needs have the same rights to attend school during all the hours the school is open as those who do not. 

These sections make it clear that all students, including those with learning support needs, have the right to attend school whenever the school is open. 

 

What are the changes?

Section 33 of the Education and Training Act 2020 (the Act) states that every domestic student in New Zealand is entitled to free enrolment and free education at any state school from their fifth birthday until 1 January following their 19th birthday.

Every student who is enrolled at a school has the right to attend that school during all the hours that it is open for instruction. 

Section 34 of the Act confirms that students who have special education needs have the same rights as students who do not. 

This does not affect any restrictions on the right to enrol and attend that are set out in sections 62 to 89 of the Act, including school enrolment schemes and suspensions.

What do boards need to do differently now?

This change is another step towards meeting international obligations in the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child and the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCROC and UNCRPD).

There is already a greater emphasis on school boards creating a culture that is inclusive and welcoming. Boards are already responsible for ensuring that the school is inclusive of, and caters for, students with differing needs. Barrier-free access to education is an objective set out in the Statement of National Education and Learning Priorities (NELP).

Providing inclusive education to all students should be taken into consideration as part of the board’s strategic thinking, goal setting, planning, budgeting, monitoring and policy making.

Boards now need to be assured that students with disabilities and learning support needs are able to exercise their right to attend school whenever it is open.

However, boards should be aware that the right to attend school whenever the school is open for instruction is not intended to prevent students from being able to attend for reduced attendance hours where their special circumstances require this. There are circumstances where it is appropriate for a student to attend for reduced hours on a temporary basis as part of a plan that will support the student to transition to fulltime attendance.

When does this come into effect?

The revised right to education and the explicit right to attendance took effect upon enactment and are in force now.

Source: www,education.govt.nz: Education and Training Act 2020 – All students have the right to attend school fulltime

Useful links

Updating the physical restraint framework

MoE commentary

Part 3, subpart 3 of the Education and Training Act includes several changes to the physical restraint framework to make it clearer that teachers and authorised staff members must not physically restrain unless it is necessary to prevent imminent harm to the health, safety or wellbeing of a child, young person or to another person, and the teacher or staff member reasonably believes there is no other option available in the circumstances. Any restraint used must be reasonable and proportionate in the circumstances. 

 

What are the changes?

A comparison between the Education & Training Act 2020 and the (now repealed) Education Act 1989 is set out in the table below:

Education & Training Act 2020
Education Act 1989

 

physically restrain, in relation to a student, means to use physical force to prevent, restrict, or subdue the movement of the student’s body or part of the student’s body against the student’s will. 

 

physically restrain, in relation to a student, means to use physical force to prevent, restrict, or subdue the movement of the student’s body or part of the student’s body.

 

A teacher or authorised staff member at a registered school must not physically restrain a student unless 

(a) the physical restraint is necessary to prevent imminent harm to the student or another person; and

(b) the teacher or authorised staff member reasonably believes that there is no other option available in the circumstances to prevent the harm; and

(c) the physical restraint is reasonable and proportionate in the circumstances.

 

A teacher or authorised staff member must not physically restrain a student unless

(a) the teacher or staff member reasonably believes that the safety of the student or of any other person is at serious and imminent risk; and

(b) the physical restraint is reasonable and proportionate in the circumstances. 

 

The Secretary must make rules prescribing the practice and procedure to be followed by employers, principals, teachers, and authorised staff members in relation to physical restraint.

When developing rules under this section, the Secretary must make reasonable efforts to consult:children and young people, in particular those who are Māori and those with disabilities or learning support needs; parents, whānau, and caregivers; national bodies representing the interests of teachers, principals, governing bodies of schools, parents and the disability community. 

 

The Secretary must make rules prescribing the practice and procedure to be followed by employers, principals, teachers, and authorised staff members in relation to physical restraint.  

 

The Secretary must, by notice in the Gazette, issue guidelines on the use of physical restraint and behaviour management at registered schools.The guidelines must include—

(a) best practice examples of:how to use physical restraint safely;how to assess significant emotional distress; understanding, and responding safely to, behaviour; and

(b) a framework for decision making and problem solving to prevent, de-escalate, and safely respond to disruptive or assaultive behaviour; and

(c) advice on assessing behaviour escalation levels that precede imminent harm to health, safety, or well-being.When developing guidelines under this section, the Secretary must make reasonable efforts to consult:children and young people, in particular those who are Māori and those with disabilities or learning support needs;parents, whānau, and caregivers;national bodies representing the interests of teachers, principals, governing bodies of schools, parents and the disability community.

Employers, principals, teachers, and authorised staff members must have regard to the guidelines. 

The Secretary must, by notice in the Gazette, issue guidelines on the use of physical restraint in registered schools.The guidelines must include—

(a) best practice examples for the use of physical restraint: and

(b) other examples of best practice in behaviour management. Employers, principals, teachers, and authorised staff members must have regard to the guidelines. 

What do boards need to do differently now?

Boards and their employees should be aware of the changes in legislation affecting the use of physical restraint in schools brought about by the enactment of the Education & Training Act 2020.

In addition, in line with previous requirements, boards should:

  • Have a policy in place around managing challenging behaviour and physical restraint
  • Ensure that school policies and practices are available to the community and clearly explained to students
  • Authorise appropriate non-teaching staff to use physical restraint
  • Ensure teachers and authorised staff are familiar with the Rules and Guidelines around the use of physical restraint
  • Ensure teachers and authorised staff receive suitable training and support around the use of physical restraint
  • Ensure that every incident of physical restraint is notified to the student’s parents and caregivers, the board and the Ministry of Education
  • Ensure that parents and caregivers are notified if physical restraint is an element in their student’s individual behaviour plan
  • Monitor incidents when physical restraint is used to look for trends and take action at governance level to support reducing such incidents

Note: Authorised staff member means an employee of a registered school who is trained and authorised by the employer to use physical restraint in accordance with the Education & Training Act 2020.

 

When does this come into effect?

The revised legislation around physical restraint took effect upon enactment and is in force now.

Source: www,education.govt.nz: Education and Training Act 2020 – Updating the physical restraint framework

 

Useful links

Resolving serious disputes

MoE Commentary

There is a lack of a free and accessible complaint and dispute resolution process in the current State compulsory schooling system.

The Act enables the establishment of new local complaint and dispute resolution panels to hear serious disputes where these cannot be resolved at the school level.

The panels will have mediation, recommendation and decision-making functions.  

What are the changes?

The scheme’s purpose is to facilitate and promote the resolution of serious disputes between students and state (including state integrated) schools in an effective, flexible and timely way. 

“Serious dispute” is defined as a dispute between a student and their school’s board about the student’s:

  • right to enrol at or attend the school, or rights to education generally
  • learning support they receive at the school
  • stand-down, suspension, exclusion or expulsion
  • experience of racism or other types of unlawful discrimination at the school
  • physical and emotional safety while at the school
  • experience of physical restraint by a teacher or authorised staff member employed or engaged at the school

Students aged 16 years and over can apply to the panel themselves. Below that age, the student can apply together with their parent, guardian or full-time caregiver.  

The application does not initially need to be in writing, but the applicant needs to first give the board an opportunity to resolve the dispute by agreement. Either they are dissatisfied with the process or outcome (or both), or the board has refused to take up this opportunity.

Regulations are planned which will spell out the processes in more detail.

Current avenues for students and their parents and whānau with unresolved issues at their school will remain after the panels come into effect. These involve contacting the Office of the Ombudsman or applying to the High Court for judicial review.  

What do boards need to do differently now?

This law change does not directly require boards to make changes. But as part of governing effectively, the board should take care to ensure its concerns and complaints processes are clear and well-known to its school communities via the usual communication channels, including the school website if the school has one. They should also be regularly reviewed.

When does this come into effect?

The ability to establish a dispute resolution scheme took effect upon enactment and is in force now. However, draft regulations are not yet available, and there is not yet a date for when the serious disputes resolution processes come into effect.

Useful links

Last updated: May 2021

School enrolment scheme changes

Development, consultation and grandparenting changes
MoE commentary

The Act [i.e. the Education and Training Act 2020] transfers responsibility for the development of, and consultation on, enrolment schemes from school boards to the Ministry of Education.

The Ministry will be required to consult a school’s board and take reasonable steps to understand the views of the school’s community when developing a proposed enrolment scheme.

Grand-parenting arrangements provide for the siblings of current students to retain the right to enrol at the school when a new home zone or amendment is implemented, provided they live in the old home zone.

Grand-parenting provisions will be used at the Secretary’s discretion when an enrolment scheme is established or when an existing enrolment scheme’s home zone is amended.

What are the changes?

The Secretary for Education of the Ministry of Education (the Ministry) is now responsible for the development and consultation processes around new and amended enrolment schemes. The Ministry’s regional offices are now delegated to carry out these roles. 

These changes mean, for example, that the Ministry defines a school’s home zone not the board, and the Ministry undertakes the required consultation relating to both the development of a scheme and, before it is finalised. 

It is also worth noting that the Ministry’s process to develop an enrolment scheme includes the requirement to be satisfied that it promotes the best use of the network of state schools in the area. Previously this was only part of the Ministry’s final approval process. 

The other key area of change for enrolment schemes is that when a new home zone or amendment is implemented, inclusion of ‘grandparenting’ provisions for siblings of an existing student is now at the Secretary for Education’s discretion. The Secretary must be satisfied it is in the school and local community’s best interest and can be managed within the existing school network.

What do boards need to do differently now?

Boards no longer control the development and consultation processes around the creation or changing of school enrolment schemes. 

However, boards will be consulted at the development stage of any proposed enrolment scheme.  Once a proposed scheme has been developed boards will be involved in, and should encourage  the school's community to engage in, further Ministry consultation. Should there be a need to amend an enrolment scheme boards will, again, have the opportunity to put their views forward and influence the Ministry’s direction.

The decision on whether siblings of existing students will be entitled to attend should they no longer live in the new or amended zone is now in the Secretary for Education’s hands, subject to specified criteria.

Note: boards remain responsible for implementing and operating finalised enrolment schemes, for example, processing out-of-zone applications.  The purpose and principles of enrolment schemes and the Ministry’s power to issue instructions and guidelines on the operation of enrolment schemes are also unchanged.                                          

When does this come into effect?

These changes came into law on 1 August 2020. They came into force from 1 January 2021, at the same time as updated Ministry Guidelines for Enrolment Schemes and Instructions for Enrolment Schemes. 

Consultation on possible changes to priority categories for school enrolment schemes

The Government commenced consultation in April 2021 on options for potential changes to the out-of-zone priority categories for school enrolment schemes. The two options for change include removing the categories for children of former students from the list of priority categories, plus other changes. The third option is to keep the current five categories unchanged. Consultation ends on 16 June 2021.

Source: education.govt.nz: Education and Training Act 2020 - Development and consultation on school enrolment schemes; Allowing the use of grand-parenting provisions at the discretion of the Secretary for Education

Useful links

Education and Training Act 2020, sections 71 - 75schedule 20

Education website

About enrolment schemes

Guidelines for the development and operation of enrolment schemes for State Schools

Guidelines for the development and operation of enrolment schemes for State Integrated Schools

Instructions relating to the operation of enrolment schemes

Proposed changes to out of zone enrolment priority categories

Last updated: May 2021

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